What is it? Twill Flap

 

Does anyone know what lodge this flap is from? I have heard from two different sources (one from an older trader at the 2009 NOAC that had one) that the youth in the lodge didn’t want a flap that people wanted to trade for, so they made this generic flap. But neither person knew what lodge that it came from.

 

 

generic oa flap

 

 

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Belive this is concedered a Trader Bill…. I have one with a generic lodge with a barcode from noac 1994

By redneck_patch_trader on February 10th, 2010 at 12:29 am

This is not one of the Trader Bill flaps. I believe it dates from the 80’s and showed up at one of the NOACs. It is a pure spoof and not attributable to any youth from any lodge.

By ISCA87L on February 10th, 2010 at 4:34 am

Now that is one ugly patch!

By jason on February 17th, 2010 at 5:36 pm

The Generic Lodge Flap was produced for the 1983 Section 5-B Section Conclave held at either Camp Stigwandish or Camp Tuscazoar in Ohio. It was either a Stigwandish Lodge or Sipp-o Lodge produced item and was for sale during the Conclave. It was a popular item for trading at the 1983 NOAC at Rutgers University and made the slide show at the close of the NOAC.

By Mike B on May 13th, 2018 at 10:40 pm

It is, in fact, a Stigwandish 114 F1 issue. It was produced specifically for the 1983 NOAC at Rutgers. It was suggested by Camp Ranger, Earl Hensel and designed by the Lodge Executive Committee when I was the Lodge Chief. During the NOAC, lodge members were able to trade one of these for as many as five other flaps. The original order had white paper backing. A second run was produced with a plastic backing. Two machines were used to make the first order…one used s black backstitch and one used a blue backstitch.

By Mike Wolfe on September 5th, 2019 at 10:37 pm

It is, in fact, a Stigwandish 114 F1 issue. It was produced specifically for the 1983 NOAC at Rutgers. It was suggested by Camp Ranger, Earl Hensel and designed by the Lodge Executive Committee when I was the Lodge Chief. During the NOAC, lodge members were able to trade one of these for as many as five other flaps. The original order had white paper backing. A second run was produced with a plastic backing. Two machines were used to make the first order…one used s black backstitch and one used a blue backstitch.

By Mike Wolfe on September 5th, 2019 at 10:40 pm

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